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want to make prior to making any real conclusions, probably is there a connection to pakistan unofficial or otherwise. is this the first attack that we're going to see and the only attack we're going to see? are there going to be more attacks in mumbai or other placesment third and probably most important, how does this affect pakistani-indian relations. that has been a border and boiling point for decades, the indiana yeah and pakistani relations. we are talking to the pakistanis saying, your biggest problem is not india, it's in pakistan and the taliban and terrorist attacks about you. the pakistanis always say, no, no it's india. who you worry about, jon, whoever's fault this is, this will increase tension between india and pakistan and those are two countries who have nuclear weapons. jon: we are looking from the state ride indian television. they are reporting eight people killed. that's what our viewers are seeing on the screen. this comes on the heels of the assassination of president karzai's brother in afghanistan. any likely correction there? >> reporter: not clear.
pakistan's failure to act against militant extremists like the network in the north, the afghan taliban and other militant extremists. we will be interested in hearing general dempsey's thoughts on how to get the pakistan military to go after terrorist groups finding sanctuary in pakistan's tribal regions. al qaeda and the arabian peninsula in yemen and al qaeda elements in somalia continue to take advantage of failing and failed states to train their operatives and to plan attacks against the united states and our interests. it is critical that we don't apply significant pressure to these terrorist organizations, and to work with governments and international organizations in the region to address the long term problems. iran remains probably the greatest risk to world peace and to regional stability. we share the concerns of many nations about iran's continued support of terrorist activities beyond its borders, development of its missile programs, and refusal to cooperate with the international atomic energy commission. while we've seen evidence that the international sanctions has pu
against al qaeda and associated groups outside of afghanistan, pakistan and iraq. director leon panetta expressed concerns on the shifting to other places most notably in yemen, somalia, north africa, and i hope he will address what you see as the appropriate role for the special operation forces in those aeas. in announcing lieutenant general allan's nomination, president obama called him, quote, the flight commander to take over the vital mission in afghanistan. if confirmed, the general will have big boots to fill and succeeding general petraeus commander of the 49 member international security assistance force coalition and u.s. forces aghanistan. like general petraeus, general allen brings an in-depth understanding of the complexities of the counterinsurgency effort based on his own experience as the coander in anbar province in iraq. working with the sunni awakening the marines andanbar succeeded in getting local sunni tribal leaders to reject the insurgency and instead support the iraqi government and its the deputy commander at u.s. central command general ellen has developed a
pakistan didn't do enough, if much avenue anything to help find usama bin laden and maybe even protected him and this morning relations between that key u.s. ally and partner in the fight against terror, is standing on even shakier ground. a report this morning in the "new york times" says the u.s. could suspend a big chunk of military aid to pakistan. and it is a lot of our money, $800 million, in security assistance. peter doocy live in washington with the details. are we looking to cut off the military of pakistan completely? >> reporter: no, but, as you said, "new york times" is reporting that we might cut $800 million out of the 2-plus billion we give pakistan in security assistance and that is because the administration does not apparently think they are being helpful in catching militant and, probably because pakistan kicked 100 of our army trainers out of the country the last few weeks and it comes very very, shortly after the strain on the u.s. relationship which was exposed following our raid on their soil to kill bin laden and earlier this week the new secretary of defense, pa
, in pakistan rather. >> today we honor a singular act of gallantry. as we near the 10th anniversary of the attacks thrust our nation into war, it is the occasion to pay tribute to a soldier and a generation that has borne the burden of our security during a hard decade of sacrifice. i want to take you back to the circumstances that led to this day. it is may 26, 2008. in the remote eastern afghanistan, near the mountainous border of pakistan. helicopters carrying dozens of a lead army rangers race over the rugged landscape. and their target is an insurgent, down. the mission is high risk. it is broad daylight. the insurgents are heavily armed. but it is considered a risk worth taking because intelligence indicates that a top al qaeda commander is in that compound. soon the helicopters touched down, and our rangers immediately come under fire. within minutes, leroy -- then a staff sergeant -- and another soldier are pushing ahead into a courtyard surrounded by high mud walls. that is when the enemy opens up with their a k-47's. leroy is hit in both legs. he's bleeding badly. but he s
, which is also the problem of pakistan, becomes a regional problem in which the country's in the region have a stake in solving and are not -- there's a reasonable chance that can be pulled off. >> dr. brzezinski, you mentioned pakistan. the focus of policy leaders. turning away from afghanistan, we got reports the journalist who was killed by the isi inside pakistan further out is complicating our relationship with that group. we announced going in to kill osama bin laden. how do we manage this relationship that's been difficult to manage for as far as the eye can see? >> well, first of all, we have to recognize we are dealing here with two sifrl conflicts. one in afghanistan and the one in pakistan. there's a conflict in pakistan. there isn't a foreign intervention trying to resolve it. it is a great internal conflict. what we are seeing in pakistan is a series of contradictory policies, contradictory engagements and contradictory engagements. the army wants to preserve a stable pakistan that is assured of security and sees the united states as a component of the success in that quest
of pakistan that will bring success to local areas. a country from kabul, it will never happen. we are wasting time and money. the fact we are leaving may assist in the development of stability in local areas. they will never be a centrally governed pakistan, i mean afghanistan. afghanistan is not like iraq. give me one more second and i'll tell you what i think is going to happen in iraq. we'll probably go back to having one bloodthirsty tyrant to rule the country. that's the irony of iraq. >> happy days, wes. >> afghanistan is extraordinarily tribal. it's difficult to have a conversation about afghanistan. one story i loved was one of the things we did in afghanistan when i was working with the civil affairs team, giving out flags to children and local leaders. they would look at the flag and say what is this. you would have to explain, it's your country. there's another thing, i think you brought up a good point, joe. afghanistan is not iraq. you are right. there's a crucial player, though that factors in. that's iran. iran is not only very active and involved, but in addition to that, iran
as well. pat. >> dr. brzezinski, let me talk to you about pakistan. powers flu out, richard nixon tilted, doctor brzezinski was over there looking down the pass. they were a great ally in the cold war. now it looks like we have lost pakistan. have we lost pakistan? if so, why and was it inevitable. >> i think we are losing pakistan. i don't know if we have lost it yet. if we disengage intelligently and engage in the umbrella i have been talking about, her happens we will lose it all together. i think the fault is two way. first of all, we have never been really consistently and comprehensively sensitive to the political interests in having a secure backyard in afghanistan. we just haven't. resently, we played with indi s indians. we give a super nuclear deal to the indians. we did not give it to the pakistanis. there's resentment there. pakistan is coming undone on its own. it's not all our undoing. there's a conflict between the army and society at large. divisions between the army and the military and intelligence. ethnic differences. regional differences in pakistan. plus, this overw
against pakistan for the selling in the last couple of weeks -- 50 people killed in afghanistan. what is the situation over there ? >> i don't have anything specific on that issue. i will tell you that our own strategic dialogue at the working level continues with pakistan on a broad range of issues. we have assistant secretary brownfield today or tomorrow continuing our law enforcement and counternarcotics dialogue with pakistan. we continue to work the full range of security and law enforcement and stability issues with pakistan. >> and just to follow up on the same issue, there was a quote that u.s. believe go that i.s.a. was involved in the killing of the pakistani journalist. do you agree with that? >> i'm not going to speak to any intelligence issues obviously from this podium. i will say that when this incident occurred back in may, we issued a very strong statement and i will repeat today that we strongly condemn the abduction and killing of reporters and we have raised our concerns with this case with the pakistanis. >> do you believe this is an act of terrorism, the killing
near the mountainous border of pakistan. helicopters carrying dozens of elite army rangers race over the rugged landscape. their target is an insurgent compound. the mission is high-risk. it is broad daylight. the insurgents are heavily armed. but it is considered a risk worth taking because if intelligence indicates that a top al qaeda commander is in that compound. soon the helicopters touch down and our rangers immediately come under fire. within minutes leroy, then a staff sergeant, and another soldier are pushing ahead into a courtyard surrounded by high mud walls. that's when the enemy opens up with the ak-47s. leroy is hit in both legs. he is bleeding badly. but he summons the strength to lead the other ranger to cover behind a chicken coop. he radios for support. he hurls a grenade at the enemy giving cover to a third ranger who rushes to their aid. an enemy grenade explodes nearby wounding leroy's two comrades. then, a second grenade lands, this time only a few feet away. every human impulse would tell someone to turn away. every soldier is trained to seek cover. that is wha
was in afghanistan, part of the rugged mountainous region near the border with pakistan that's perfect for hiding out in. sergeant petry's unit was assigned to make a risky daylight raid on a compound why u.s. intelligence said a top al qaeda commander was hiding. the moment the helicopter landed they came under fire. within minutes as they moved into a court yard in the compound a machine gun round went through both of his legs. he was bleedly badly. he nevertheless aided another wounded soldier leaving him to take cover behind a chicken coop in the courtyard. he did this with severe injuries to both of his legs. sergeant petry launched a grenade in the direction of the enemy fighters, who were shooting at the rangers. that provided enough cover for a third ranger to join them behind the chicken coop to evaluate the wounds. an enemy grenade exploded in the courtyard. it further hurt the ranger that he was helping and the third ranger. a second grenade thrown by the energy fighters landed next to the three wounded rangers. it had not exploded yet. sergeant petry dressed his own wound at the time. his
. four suspected u.s. drone strikes in northwestern pakistan killed at least 42 alleged militants in less than 12 hours. the attacks come at a time when relations between the united states and pakistan are especially strained. if you haven't noticed. the white house just cut $800 million in aid to pakistan's military. >> special wake-up for the crews of the shuttle at the international space station. >> ♪ rocket man i'm burning out of ♪ >> good morning, atlantis! this is elton john. we wish you much success on your mission and a huge thank you to all the men and women at nasa who worked on the shuttle for the last three decades. >> good morning, houston. elton john. he's a legend. wow. that is absolutely fantastic. >> "rocket man" is a popular wake-up song for nasa used three times before. they are taking supplies to the space station. >> i wonder if roger clemens will use that in his trial today. friends and relatives of a murder victim attacking a suspect in the courthouse hallway. things got so out of control, as you see, officers had to use tasers. the video was released after
to attack pakistan, they can declare that as a saving too. but here's the problem, and the congressman stated it well. there are aspects of the two plans that are acceptable, and the president has vetoed those, and that is why mitch mcconnell is saying to harry reid, look, you're not going to impose your plan on a senate, 47 members who are republicans, we're going to have to deal. and i think they are going to deal, alex. they're going to send something back over to the house, and i think the house will probably have to pass it on monday or tuesday. >> okay. morris, did you think harry reid has given up too many with this bill, and do you think he's going to have to give up more to get republican support? >> i think there's going to be a lot of compromise. and remember, compromise is not a bad word. in this town, some days compromise seems like a bad word, but that's what you do when you negotiate. when you don't have an absolute majority, you have to give a little to get a little. and for some reason, this town has lost that understanding, that it is really not about whose parties ar
states is encouraged by the ongoing talks between nuclear armed rivals india and pakistan and promises to give full support to indian efforts to protect itself from whatever. a triple bombing killed 20 people in mumbai. a spokesman says a the country had been stalling new and efficient centrifuges aimed at speeding up its nuclear enrichment. tehran may be moving toward weapon-grade arms. he did not elaborate on the specifications of the machines bank in london, rupert murdoch has arrived at britain's parliament ahead of his appearance before lawmakers. he will be questioned about the investigation that brought down the newspaper. his son and rebekah brooks are also expected to appear. those are some of the latest headlines on c-span radio. >> the c-span network -- we provide coverage of politics, public affairs, nonfiction books, and american history. it is all available to you. find our content any time throughout c-span's video library. bringing our resources to your community. is washington, -- it is washington, your way. >> ann coulter has something to say. sunday, august 7, your c
on the border of pakistan and afghanistan. perhaps it is time to shut down $17 billion worth of money going for reconstruction projects when our track record really stings when it comes to reconstruction projects. i hope that you all will convince me that i have become cynical and angry and frustrated about the way we are spending money in theater. i am looking for good news, and i hope we hear some today. but i think it is time for a guest check because i have too many people in missouri saying why can we fix this road? then i look at the practice we are building in afghanistan and it is hard to explain to them why we cannot fix that road. because we cannot afford it, but yet we can throw money away in afghanistan on projects that are not sustainable. if anybody had spent time thinking about it in the first place, they would have realized that. that kind of accountability has to be present. i am pleased that we have a number of witnesses today that are going to testify to contracting in theater. let me say this is -- good, the senator is here. i will give him time to get settled and we wil
al-qaeda move money and fighters in to pakistan and afghanistan. here now, a spokesman for four u.s. ambassadors. thanks for being with us. we known about their support of terror groups throughout the years, hezbollah and others but what about al-qaeda is this is the first time we've had solid evidence? >> it's actually not the first time. the four individuals that were designated in 2009. don't forget that the 9/11 commission report called out this phenomenon, said that al-qaeda and iran are working together. i think thursday's announcement is good news. we should congratulate david cohenfor making this announcement and pushing through this decision. i'm sure it was very difficult. the state department under secretary clinton has not been so forth right. hopefully by designating the six individuals that we can move the diplomacy and force a lost these countries that are protecting terrorists by not enforcing banking laws. certainly the u.n. has asked them to enforce banking laws. >> gregg: i'm glad you brought up the united nations. when it comes to fighting terrorism is the unit
26, 2008, in the remote east of afghanistan near the border of pakistan. helicopters carrying thousands of elite army rangers race over the rugged landscape. their target is an insurgent compound. the mission is high risk. it is broad daylight. the insurgents are heavily armed, but it is considered a risk worth taking, because intelligence indicates a toss out the -- a top of kited commander is in that compound. -- a top al qaeda commander is in that compound. within minutes, lee roy and another soldier are pushing ahead into a courtyard surrounded by high mud walls, and that is when the enemy opened up with ak-47s. leroy is hit. he is leaving badly, but he summons the strength to lead the other rangers -- he is a badly, gla -- bleeding but he summons the strength to lead other rangers. an enemy grenade explosions nearby, wounding and leroy's two comrades, and a second grenade lands only a few feet away. every human impulse would tell someone to turn away. every soldier is trained to seek cover. that is what the sergeant could have done. instead, this wounded ranger, the 28-ye
the pakistan isi. >> we have money going to the ngo's whichever rejected it. we have an organization here in the united states helping egypt to manage elections. thee giving some money to justice and interior ministers. it is a matter of sovereignty, to have some money from abroad [unintelligible] not egypt only can accept that. >> i would ask two more questions and then we will turn it over to steve. you mentioned that you and your colleagues are ready to go back to your professional jobs as military men. eager. >> that is correct. >> since 1952 the egyptian military has played a fairly prominent role in egyptian life. you cannot say that it has only played a military role but it has played in military and political role since 1952. and right now you're playing one of your most important roles in your history. if the project works committee parliament company president, and we are on a new track toward democratic egypt, which many of us here very much hope will happen, what kind of role will the military still play? there are two models that i have in mind. one is turkey in the 1980's, t
on the border of pakistan and afghanistan. perhaps it's time to shut down $17 billion worth of money going for reconstruction projects when our track record really stinks when it comes to reconstruction projects. now, i hope that you all are going to convince me i've become cynical and angry and frustrated about the way we're spending money in theater and i want to tell you i'm looking for good news. i hope we hear some today. but i think it is really time for a gut check. because i've got too many people in missouri saying, why can't we fix this road? then i look at the projects that we're building in afghanistan and it's hard to explain to them why we can't fix that road because we can't afford it, but yet we can throw money away in afghanistan on projects that are clearly not sustainable and if anybody would have spent time thinking about it in the first place, they would have realized that. that kind of planning has to begin happening and that kind of accountability has to be present. i'm pleased we have a number of witnesses today that are going to testify to contracting in theaters a
and pakistan and officials at the iranian mission in new york are calling the allegations totally baseless. and, our next guest, see if he agrees, ambassador john bolton, former u.n. ambassador and a fox news contributor. baseless or not. >> good morning to you, this is something many people have felt was going on for some time and the treasury department's own announcement says they can track iran's assistance to al qaeda back for five years, and i suspect it went on longer than that and, it has a dramatic effect, i think, on what we are all talking about, today, as we look at this debt ceiling issue. you had al milladmiral mullen o with the troops in afghanistan and, with the efforts in afghanistan, and to see the full efforts and larger defense budget now at risk in these debt ceiling talks, i find it absolutely unbelievable. >> let's talk more about that timing, again, the first time our country has formally accused iran of this, and as you said, rightfully so, this is rumored for years, what do you make of the timing? >> well, i think this is probably something driven by internal treasury
, pakistan, with the veterans cost and all that, tax cuts, medicare part d, which none of those are paid for, $6.3 trillion, cutting the deficit down to $7.6. last thing here, if the viewers would go to the "wall street journal" january 9, 2009, bush on jobs, you will see where a man wrote an article, look down at the bottom and there is an actual chart that says what the president's job performance from 1945 to 2008 and it only reason i didn't include obama, he has not completed his full term. i have five more seconds. six republican president necessary control for 36 years and created jobs, which is $980,500 an average. >> put a lot out there, what do you want to respond to? >> $14.3 trillion is the national debt ceiling right now. we have exceeded that and that is what the fight is and on congress, whether or not to increase the national debt ceiling that has never, we never not increased the debt ceiling and look, there are a lot of drivers to this. there is increased cost in medicare, there is defense spending, there is lower tax revenue, there was tax cuts instituted in 2001 -- in 2001
in pakistan just an hour away from islama bad. they raided the congresswoman pound. and in the burst of gun fire, the al qaeda leader was killed and his body buried at sea. as america celebrated and the world wondered about retaliation . >> we should remember in particular the brave servicemen and women who gave their lives against terrorism across the world and pay tribute to the british forces who played their part over the last decade in the hunt for bin laden. he was responsible for 9/11. which was not only a horrific killing of americans but remains to this day the largest loss of british life in any terrorist attack. as a head of a family group of flight 93 put it, we are willing to make an exception in this case. he was evil personified and our world is a better place without him. >> while understanding the satisfaction and elation of those who lost family members on 9/11, my friend agrees that the sober reality is that some things are unchanged by the death of osama bin laden. the threat remains and jihad must be confronted and adequate resources, effective international cooperation
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)

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